I Have A Dream
Martin Luther King, Jr.

In Honor of Martin Luther King Day

I Have A Dream - Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr. said these "I Have a Dream" words on August 28, 1963, in front of the Lincoln Memorial of Washington, DC, to a crowd, in protest to discrimination and racism against African Americans:

"I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal."

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave-owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state sweltering with the heat of injustice and oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plains, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

This will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with new meaning "My country 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring."

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.

Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.

Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous peaks of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and mole hill of Mississippi.

From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of that old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! Free at last! Thank God almighty, we are free at last!"
- Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was put in the Burmingham, Alabama jail, in 1963, for leading a non violent protest against segregation. He believed that through violence, nothing would be gained.

In a letter that he wrote while jailed, he wrote:
"Non violent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue." Injustice anywhere, is a threat to justice everywhere. One who breaks an unjust law must do it openly, lovingly."

Martin Luther King, Jr. was very much influenced by the life of Mahatma Gandhi, one of the greatest Indian leaders and Henry Thoreau, who was a philosopher.

He struggled greatly for their freedom and lead in a non violent manner, both blacks and whites to marches and boycotts and sit downs and was later to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

In 1964, President Johnson signed "The Civil Rights Act of 1964," stating that under the Constitution, blacks had the same rights as whites, both in the South and North.

He was shot and murdered in 1968, as he prepared to help in support of a strike of the Memphis, Tenn. sanitation workers and a march for the poor people. As he stood outside his motel room, he was assassinated by James Earl Ray.

The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was born on January 15, 1929. The Third Monday in January, Martin Luther King Day, which is a national holiday in the United States, is celebrated in his honor.

Sacrifice

There can be no real and abiding happiness without sacrifice. Our greatest joys do not result from our efforts toward self-gratification, but from a loving and spontaneous service to other lives. Joy comes not to him who seeks it for himself, but to him who seeks it for other people.
- H. W. Sylvester.


Martin Luther King, Jr. Quotes

Like an unchecked cancer, hate corrodes the
personality and eats away its vital unity.
Hate destroys a man's sense of values and his
objectivity. It causes him to describe the
beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful,
and to confuse the true with the false and
the false with the true. Power at its best
is love implementing the demands of justice.
Justice at its best is love correcting
everything that stands against love.
- Quote by the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

I refuse to accept the view
that mankind is so tragically
bound to the starless midnight
of racism and war that the bright
daybreak of peace and brotherhood
can never become a reality...
I believe that unarmed truth
and unconditional love
will have the final word.
- Quote by Martin Luther King, Jr.

Quotes by Martin Luther King, Jr.
Like an unchecked cancer, hate corrodes the
personality and eats away its vital unity.
Hate destroys a man's sense of values and his
objectivity. It causes him to describe the
beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful,
and to confuse the true with the false and
the false with the true. Power at its best
is love implementing the demands of justice.
Justice at its best is love correcting
everything that stands against love.
- Quote by Martin Luther King, Jr.

Books that were written by
Martin Luther King, Jr.:

Trumpet of Conscience
Stride Toward Freedom
Strenght to Love
Why We Can't Wait

If one dream should fall and break
into a thousand pieces, never be
afraid to pick one of those
pieces up and begin again.
- Quote by Flavia Weeden

Martin Luther King, Jr. Quotes

Martin Luther King, Jr. Quotes
Martin Luther King, Jr. Quotes

House of
Dreams Poems

Index

ROMANTIC
LOVE SECRETS

The Best Of Love,
And Romance

I Have A Dream - Martin Luther King, Jr. - Martin Luther King Day





 

Land of Dreams Poem by William Blake - House of Dreams Poems| The Dreamer - Words of Inspiration| I Have A Dream - Martin Luther King, Jr.| A Dream Lies Dead Poems - Poem by Dorothy Parker| A Dream within a Dream Love Poems - Poem by Edgar Allan Poe| Make Believe Dreams Love Poems| Dreams Poem by Anne Bronte| A Day Dream Poem by Emily Bronte - House of Dreams Poems| Pilate's Wife's Dream Poem by Charlotte Bronte| The Dream Called Life Poem by Edward Fitzgerald| Dream Pedlary Poem by Thomas Lovell Beddose - Poems About Dreams| Woman Of My Imagination's Dreams Poems About Women - Poem by John Clare| Quotes About Hope| Love Poems| Reflections On Life| Thanksgiving Quotes| Native American Quotes| Quotes About Death| Texas Quotes| Christmas Holiday Pages| Christmas Songs For The Holidays| Easter Holidays
St. Valentine's Day| Saint Patrick's Day|